The Hockey Player

Despite the chaos of the studio, I still managed to complete a piece for a member of the extended family.  It was a birthday gift for an eleven year old hockey player.

Back when I first started painting, I used to use a loose form of pointillism in my portraits and landscapes. I found pointillism easy to do on locations and from life.  Within a few hours, I could quickly get the form and colour of the composition down and then return to the studio to complete the work.

In this case, I used to pointillism to deal with the challenge of a largely white uniform against a largely white background.  The use of dots also help to reintroduce some energy to the composition that was based on one reference photo (always a major challenge).

Given that I was still painting the studio, I really felt the time pressures on this one.  In the end, everyone seemed pleased with the results.

sports art
The Hockey Player (2018) by Artist Chris Erskine

 

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Studio – Putting Everything Back

The Studio is painted.  Now comes the hard part, putting everything back.

Part of my goal with the painting project was to free up space for larger works.  I need more wall space to paint and photograph my paintings.  I also need more storage space for future paintings that will be larger than my current body of work. As a result, putting the studio together will be a real challenge.

Yes (I know, I Know) you can throw some stuff out, but supplies take up a lot of room. I have considered off site locations for storing paintings, but I not confident about the climate conditions or the problems of rodents. I used warm and cold storage and the climate and dust still takes a toll.

I will work something out, but it may take some time. In the meantime, it is almost impossible to work on anything.

Chris Erskine's Art Studio
The state of my studio; as of Sept 9th, 2018.

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What Did You Do On Your Summer Vacation?

 

Answer, I painted my studio.

When I moved into my current studio, the most pressing issue was getting everything setup.  There was no time to paint, and so I had to live with the wonderful deep red wine walls, vintage 1980.

Not only was this color very dated, but it created real problems with photographing my art work. The dark walls provided very little reflected light and this meant that I had to pump up the lighting, which in turn, create a glare on the surface of the canvases.  Not the best results for documenting art that was leaving your studio forever.

The problem with painting your studio, however, is all those wonderful paint supplies have to be move out.  It is my version of the big bang – starting with a very compact ball of supplies, thousands of items expand out from the studio and occupy the surrounding region of space. It is not a pretty sight and nearly two months later, all those supplies are still expanding outwards.

Of course, everyone is very helpful with suggestions about what I should keep and what I should throw out. Thing one and Thing two will come down stairs and look gravely at the situation and then ask for some art supplies for their latest craft project.  They appreciate the white walls, but what they really want is their crafts shop to be restored to its proper order.

Hop to it dad!

Studio paint Job - WIP
The painting of my studio begins, as of July 31st, 2018.

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