Studio Cam 2 – Chris Erskine urban landscape artist

Studio Cam 2 - a peak into artist chris erskine's studio
Studio Cam 2 – a peak into artist chris erskine’s studio

Studio Cam is a periodic peak into the studio of urban landscape artist, chris erskine.

Chris Erskine

urban landscape artist

chriserskineartist@gmail.com

@erskinec

Art Post No.15

Art Post No.15

Art Post No.15
Art Post No.15

Art Post is a weekly review of the art related activities of Chris Erskine.

I continue to work on the “Bold Street Art Painting Project”.  As I have mentioned before, this project represents my return to painting after about 10 years as a print maker.

In the past, I explored how time impacts an individual or a particular landscape through portrait paintings. Now, I have shifted my focus to urban architectural landscapes.

With my return to painting, I have also decided to switch from acrylics to oils.  Oils have a richness that seems difficult to produce with acrylics.

If you look at the right hand column of photos, you will note my work to date.

After sketching out the various buildings that make up Bold Street project, I decided to jump right into painting composition.  This proved to be a mistake.

So, I took a step back, and decided to do a series of small studies.  This will allow me to work out the details of each building and get more comfortable with using oil paints.

At the moment, I am working on the under-painting in acrylics.  This layer will work out the grey tones in the composition.  Once this is completed, I will add colour using the oil paints.

This is a very traditional-academic approach to painting, I hope it works out.

Chris Erskine

chriserskineartist@gmail.com

@erskinec

 

Urban #HamOnt Sound Mapping

 

 

We often define landscapes by appearance, but they are also defined by sound.

Hunter and MacNab is an interesting mix of technology and history.  The MacNab Street Church was built in 1854 and expressed the confidence and belief in progress and faith.  By the 1890s, the Toronto-Hamilton and Buffalo Railway had ripped through the heart of Hamilton with railway tracks that divided rich and poor communities.  Less than 20 feet from the front door of the church, the physical barriers to the downtown would only grow with the development of the car and the increase road traffic on Hunter Street.

Equal to the physical barriers are the sound barriers.  Here are sounds of trains and cars that separate the Downtown business districts from the Durand neighborhood.

The first sound track marks the arrival of the commuter train from Toronto.

The second clip records the sound of the accessible crosswalk, along with the early evening car traffic.

Chris Erskine

chriserskineartist@gmail.com

@erskinec

#Art Post No.7 – Very Merry Hermitage Xmas

I like to wish everyone the very best during the holiday seasons.  Here are a few moments of the Hermitage Ruins landscape covered in snow from earlier this month.  Unfortunately, it looks like a green Christmas this year, so please enjoy this short video as my Xmas card to you.

Chris Erskine

chriserskineartist@gmail.com

@erskinec

Art Post No.6

The arrival of two new books on Max Beckmann (German Artist, 1884-1950).  Reflecting on my art while cleaning up the studio.

Chris Erskine

chriserskineartist@gmail.com

@erskinec

Hermitage Sound Landscape Recordings

Less than 12 hours after the snow storm on Thursday, December 11, 2014; I travelled to the Hermitage Ruins in Ancaster, Ontario to record the sounds of the landscape.  I was amazed to discover the amount of people who had already visited the mansion.  Quite surprising given that I was at the Hermitage by 10 am on Friday (a work day for most people).

My goal for this visit and future visits to other architecture significant buildings is to document their sounds.  Do particularly buildings have unique sound characteristics?

I was very surprised by the amount of human noise at the Hermitage.  The following sound clip is a mixture of sounds captured at the Hermitage.

 

 

When the humans disappear the landscapes come alive with animal sounds.  In this recording, squires and woodpeckers being the chief noise makers.  Crows, however, always liked to get their two cents into any landscape conversation (smile).

 

 

This was my first real attempt at capturing landscape sounds with my Zoom H4n field recorder and pair of Rode M5 mini shotgun mics.  The goal is to capture the unique sound qualities of each rural and urban landscape in the Hamilton area.  As I gain more experience, I hope to create richer and fuller sound narratives of each building and its landscape.

Thanks for listening.

 

Chris Erskine

chriserskineartist@gmail.com

@erskinec

Art Post No.5 – Studio Clean-Up

The summer has been very busy and the result is one very messy studio.  Before I can start on my winter season of art projects, the studio must be cleaned, no matter how much I hatre cleaning.

Chris Erskine

chriserskineartist@gmail.com

@erskinec